THE HISTORY OF WOMEN AND SCIENCE, HEALTH, AND TECHNOLOGY:
A BIBLIOGRAPHIC GUIDE TO THE PROFESSIONS AND THE DISCIPLINES

General and Multidisciplinary Works, L - Z (143-212)


ID: GLSHW-2.4.2
 
General and Multidisciplinary Works, L - Z (143-212)
 
This section covers general works on gender issues in the history of women in
science. It further addresses career issues for women scientists -- educational
barriers and opportunities, entry into scientific and technical professions,
status issues, and statistics. Some contemporary studies are included that bear
out historical trends. Additional works on these themes appear in the sections
on particular branches of the sciences.
 
 143      LaFollette, Marcel C. "Eyes on the Stars: Images of Women Scientists
in Popular Magazines." SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND HUMAN VALUES 13 (1988):
262-275. Describes U.S. magazines from 1910-1955.
 
 144      LaFollette, Marcel C. MAKING SCIENCE OUR OWN: PUBLIC IMAGES OF
SCIENCE, 1910-1955. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1990. Includes
section "Women in the Laboratories," pp.78-97.
 
 145      Levin, Miriam R., and Mack, Pamela E. "The Transformation of Science
Education at Mount Holyoke in the Gilded Age." Paper presented at the Joint
Meetings of the American Historical Association and the History of Science
Society (December 28, 1988), available from ERIC (#ED309930). Discusses changes
made in the science curriculum in the late nineteenth century to keep pace with
opening positions in teaching, medicine, and research to women. Includes
biographical information on faculty member Cornelia Clapp.
 
 146      Long, J. Scott. "The Origins of Sex Differences in Science." SOCIAL
FORCES 68 (June 1990): 1297-1316. Examines differences in productivity as
measured by number of publications by male biochemists who received PhD.s
between 1956-58 and 1961-63 and female biochemists who did so between
1950-1967.
 
 147      Lonsdale, Kathleen. "Women in Science: Reminiscences and
Reflections." IMPACT OF SCIENCE ON SOCIETY 20, no.1 (January-March 1970):
45-59. Entire issue is devoted to "Women in the Age of Science and Technology.
 
 148      MacLoed, Roy, and Moseley, Russell. "Fathers and Daughters:
Reflections on Women, Science, and Victorian Cambridge." HISTORY OF EDUCATION
8, no.4 (1979): 321-333.
 
 149      Malcolm, Shirley Mahaley, Hall, Paula Quick, and Brown, Janet Welsch.
THE DOUBLE BIND: THE PRICE OF BEING A MINORITY WOMAN IN SCIENCE. Washington:
American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1976. (AAAS Report, 76-
R-3)
 
 150      Mandula, Barbara. "Talks at AAAS Meeting: Women Scientists Still
Behind." AWIS MAGAZINE 20, no.3, (May/June 1991): 10-11. Summary of
presentations at an American Association for the Advancement of Science session
on "Science Policy for Women in Science: Lessons from Historical and
Contemporary Case Studies."
 
 151      Manthorpe, Catherine. "Science or Domestic Science?: The Struggle to
Define an Appropriate Science Education for Girls in Early Twentieth-Century
England." HISTORY OF EDUCATION 15 (1986): 195-213.
 
 152      Mason, Joan. "The Admission of the First Women to the Royal Society
of London." NOTES AND RECORDS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON 46 (1992):
279-300. On Kathleen Lonsdale and Marjory  Stephenson.
 
 153      Mason, Joan. "Women in Science: Breaking out of the Circle." NOTES
AND RECORDS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON 46 (1992): 177-182.
 
 154      Mattfeld, Jacquelyn A., and Van Aken, Carol G., eds. WOMEN AND THE
SCIENTIFIC PROFESSIONS: THE MIT SYMPOSIUM ON AMERICAN WOMEN IN SCIENCE AND
ENGINEERING. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 1965; Westport,  CT: Greenwood, 1976. Papers
by Bruno Bettelheim, Alice S. Rossi, James R. Killian Jr., Richard H. Bolt,
Jessie Bernard, Lillian Gilbreth, Erik H. Erikson, plus panelists' remarks.
 
 155      Menninger, Sally Ann, and Rose, Clare. "Women Scientists and
Engineers in American Academia." INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF WOMEN'S STUDIES 3,
no.3 (May/June 1980): 292-299. Reports on a national  study of employment
patterns of women scientists and engineers in American colleges and
universities.
 
 156      Meyer, Gerald Dennis. THE SCIENTIFIC LADY IN ENGLAND, 1650-1760: AN
ACCOUNT OF HER RISE, WITH EMPHASIS ON THE MAJOR ROLES OF THE TELESCOPE AND
MICROSCOPE. Berkeley: University of California  Press, 1980. A study of books,
periodicals, and treatises on science written for female readers in 17th- and
18th-century England.
 
 157      Morantz-Sanchez, Regina Markell. "The Many Faces of Intimacy:
Professional Options and Personal Choices among Nineteenth- and Twentieth-
Century Women Physicians." In UNEASY CAREERS AND INTIMATE LIVES: WOMEN IN
SCIENCE, 1789-1979, ed. Pnina G. Abir-Am and Dorinda Outram, pp.45-59. New
Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1987.
 
 158      Morrison-Low, A.D. "Women in the Nineteenth-Century Scientific
Instrument Trade." In SCIENCE AND SENSIBILITY: GENDER AND SCIENTIFIC ENQUIRY,
1780-1945, ed. by Marina Benjamin, pp.89-117. Cambridge, MA: Basil Blackwell,
1991.
 
 159      Mozans, H.J. (pseudonym of John Augustine Zahm) WOMAN IN SCIENCE. New
York: D. Appleton and Co., 1913; Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1974; Notre Dame,
IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1991. Covers women in mathematics,
astronomy,physics, chemistry, the natural sciences, medicine and surgery, and
archaeology, as well as women as inventors and as collaborators and inspirers
of male scientists. Opens with a 100-page overview of "Woman's Long Struggle
for Things of the Mind" and closes with a chapter on "The Future of Women in
Science." Includes bibliography.
 
 160      Myers, Greg. "Science for Women and Children: The Dialogue of Popular
Science in the 19th Century." In NATURE TRANSFIGURED: SCIENCE AND LITERATURE,
1700-1900, ed. John Christie & Sally Shuttleworth, pp.171-200. Manchester,
England: Manchester University Press, 1989.
 
 161      Neverdon-Morton, Cynthia. AFRO-AMERICAN WOMEN OF THE SOUTH AND THE
ADVANCEMENT OF THE RACE, 1895-1925. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press,
1989. Mainly concerned with social service programs in Virginia, Alabama,
Georgia, and Maryland, and the development of a National Organization of Afro-
American Women; includes information on health programs and higher education
opportunities for Afro-American women, including nursing and domestic science.
 
 162      Noble, David F. "A World Without Women." TECHNOLOGY REVIEW 95
(May/June 1992): 52-57. An article adapted from Noble's A WORLD WITHOUT WOMEN:
THE CLERICAL CULTURE OF WESTERN SCIENCE.
 
 163      Noble, David F. A WORLD WITHOUT WOMEN: THE CLERICAL CULTURE OF
WESTERN SCIENCE. New York: Knopf, 1992. Ascetic religious culture's role in the
exclusion of women from the development of modern science.
 
 164      Ogilvie, Marilyn Bailey. "Marital Collaboration: An Approach to
Science." In UNEASY CAREERS AND INTIMATE LIVES: WOMEN IN SCIENCE, 1789-1979,
ed. Pnina G. Abir-Am and Dorinda Outram, pp.104-125. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers
University Press, 1987.
 
 165      Outram, Dorinda. "Fat, Gorillas, and Misogyny: Women's History in
Science." THE BRITISH JOURNAL FOR THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE 24, no.82 (September
1991): 361-368.
 
 166      Phillips, Patricia. "Science and the Ladies of Fashion." NEW
SCIENTIST 95, no.1318 (12 August 1982): 416-418. Maragaret Cavendish, Aphra
Behn, Elizabeth Carter.
 
 167      Phillips, Patricia. THE SCIENTIFIC LADY: A SOCIAL HISTORY OF WOMEN'S
SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS, 1520-1918. New York: St. Martin's, 1990. Traditional
views of science as inferior to the classics and of women as naturally
scientific allowed women to pursue scientific interests for centuries in
England and the Continent. This book looks at who these women were and what and
how they studied.
 
 168      Ramaley, Judith A., ed. COVERT DISCRIMINATION AND WOMEN IN THE
SCIENCES. Boulder, CO: Westview, 1978. (AAAS Selected Symposium, 14) Five
papers document sex discrimination and discuss solutions. Not historical.
 
 169      Richter, Derek, ed. WOMEN SCIENTISTS: THE ROAD TO LIBERATION. London:
Macmillan, 1982. First person accounts by twelve women about their careers in
ten different countries. Some reports include historical background.
 
 170      Robbins, Mary Louise, ed. A HISTORY OF SIGMA DELTA EPSILON,
1921-1971: GRADUATE WOMEN IN SCIENCE. Graduate Women in Science, 1971. See also
1972-78 Supplement by Robbins (1978) and 1979-1986 Supplement by Ruth
Strathearn Dickie, both published by SDE-Graduate Women in Science.
 
 171      Ross, Mary Martin. "Women's Struggles to Enter Medicine: Two
Nineteenth-Century Women Physicians in America." PHAROS OF ALPHA OMEGA ALPHA-
HONOR MEDICAL SOCIETY 55, no.1 (Winter 1992): 33+.
 
 172      Rossi, Alice S. "Women in Science: Why So Few?" SCIENCE 148, no.3674
(28 May 1965): 1196-1202. Discusses how "social and psychological influences
restrict women's choice and pursuit of careers in science" in the 1960s.
 
 173      Rossiter, Margaret W. "Sexual Segregation in the Sciences: Some Data
and a Model." SIGNS 4, no.1 (Autumn 1978): 146-151. Statistics for 1920-1938.
Repr. in SEX AND SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY, pp.35-40. Ed. by Sandra Harding and Jean
F. O'Barr. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987.
 
 174      Rossiter, Margaret W. "Women and the History of Scientific
Communication." JOURNAL OF LIBRARY HISTORY 21 (1986): 39-59.
 
 175      Rossiter, Margaret W. "`Women's Work' in Science, 1880-1910." ISIS
71, no.258 (September 1980): 381-398. Covers women in astronomy, scientific
employment in the federal government, higher education, and home economics.
 
 176      Rossiter, Margaret W. "Women Scientists in America Before 1920."
AMERICAN SCIENTIST 62, no.3 (May-June 1974): 312-323. Covers women's scientific
education, career patterns, and achievements. Includes tables and
illustrations. Repr. in DYNAMOS AND VIRGINS REVISITED: WOMEN AND TECHNOLOGICAL
CHANGE IN HISTORY, pp.120-148. Ed. by Martha Moore Trescott. Metuchen, NJ:
Scarecrow, 1979.
 
 177      Rossiter, Margaret W. WOMEN SCIENTISTS IN AMERICA: STRUGGLES AND
STRATEGIES TO 1940. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1982. A richly
detailed history of American women's education and employment in the sciences
prior to World War II. Extensive references to primary sources.
 
 178      Sabin, Florence. "Women in Science." SCIENCE 38 (1936): 24-36.
 
 179      SAGE: A SCHOLARLY JOURNAL ON BLACK WOMEN 6, no.2 (Fall 1989); Special
Issue: "Science and Technology." Contents: Kenneth Manning, "Roger Arliner
Young;" Rosalyn Patterson, "Black Women in the Biological Sciences;" Shirley
Malcolm, "Increasing the Participation of Black Women in Science and
Technology;" Sylvia T. Bozeman, "Black Women Mathematicians: In Short Supply;"
Valerie L. Thomas, "Black Women Engineers and Technologists;" Patricia Carter
Sluby, "Black Women and Inventions;" Etta Z. Falconer, "A Story of Success: The
Sciences at Spelman College;" Jewel Plummer Cobb, "A Life in Science: Research
and Service;" Evelyn Boyd Granville, "My Life as a Mathematician;" Reatha Clark
King, "Becoming a Scientist: An Important Career Decision;" Jennie R. Patrick,
"Trials, Tribulations, Triumphs;" Ronald Mickens, "Black Women in Science and
Technology: A Selected Bibliography;" book reviews.
 
 180      Schiebinger, Londa L. THE MIND HAS NO SEX?: WOMEN IN THE ORIGINS OF
MODERN SCIENCE. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1989. Covers both the
history of women's contributions to the development of early modern science and
the interrelationship between their subsequent exclusion from science and the
growth of new "scientific" doctrines of gender differences.
 
 181      Shmurak, Carole B., and Handler, Bonnie S. "Castle of Science: Mount
Holyoke College and the Preparation of Women in Chemistry, 1837-1941." HISTORY
OF EDUCATION QUARTERLY 32, no.3 (Fall 1992): 315-342.
 
 182      Shmurak, Carole B., and Handler, Bonnie S. "Lydia Shattuck: `A Streak
of the Modern.'" TEACHING EDUCATION 3, no.2 (Winter-Spring 1991): 127-131.
Shattuck taught chemistry and botany at Mount Holyoke in the mid-nineteenth
century.
 
 183      Shteir, Ann B. "`A Connecting Link': Women, Popularisation, and the
History of Science." RFR/DRF 15, no.3 (1986): 38-39.
 
 184      Singer, Charles. "The Scientific Views and Visions of Saint Hildegard
(1098-1180)." In STUDIES IN THE HISTORY AND METHOD OF SCIENCE, ed. by Charles
Singer, pp.1-55. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1917.
 
 185      Sloan, Jan Butin. "The Founding of the Naples Table Association for
Promoting Scientific Research by Women." SIGNS 4, no.1 (Autumn 1978): 208-216.
 
 186      Solomon, Barbara Miller. "Historical Determinants in Individual Life
Experiences of Successful Professional Women." In SUCCESSFUL WOMEN IN THE
SCIENCES: AN ANALYSIS OF DETERMINANTS, ed. by Ruth B. Kundsin, pp.170-178.
(ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES 208, 1973.) Repr. with title, WOMEN
AND SUCCESS: THE ANATOMY OF ACHIEVEMENT. New York: Morrow, 1974.
 
 187      Standish, Leanna. "Women, Work, and the Scientific Enterprise."
SCIENCE FOR THE PEOPLE 14, no.5 (September/October 1982): 12-18.
 
 188      Stepan, Nancy Leys. "Women and Natural Knowledge: The Role of Gender
in the Making of Modern Science." GENDER & HISTORY 2, no.3 (1990): 337-342.
Review essay on recent books by Schiebinger, Russet, and Jordanova.
 
 189      Stolte-Heiskanen, Veronica. WOMEN IN SCIENCE: TOKEN WOMEN OR GENDER
EQUALITY? New York ; Oxford: Berg, 1991. International perspectives on women's
careers in science.
 
 190      Tanio, Nadine. "Gendering the History of Science." NUNCIUS 6, no.2
(1991): 295-305. Essay review on books on science and gender.
 
 191      Tavill, A.A. "Early Medical Co-Education and Women's Medical College,
Kingston, Ontario 1880-1894." HISTORIC KINGSTON 30 (January 1982): 68-89.
 
 192      Trecker, Janice Law. "Sex, Science, and Education." AMERICAN
QUARTERLY 26, no.4 (October 1974): 352-366. Examines 19th-century scientific
and medical opposition to higher education for women.
 
 193      Trescott, Martha Moore. "Women and Engineering Education: Historical
Sketches." In WOMEN AND ENGINEERING EDUCATION: REPORT ON A CONFERENCE OF THE
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, 20 AND 21 MARCH 1987, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA,
pp.II1-II16. Northridge, CA: Women in Science and Engineering Programs, School
of Engineering and Computer Science, California State University, 1988.
 
 194      United States. National Science Foundation. WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN
SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. Washington, D.C.: National Science Foundation, 1982-
present. Biennial source of statistics.
 
 195      United States. National Science Foundation. WOMEN IN SCIENTIFIC
CAREERS. Washington, D.C.: National Science Foundation, 1961.
 
 196      United States. Women's Bureau. THE OUTLOOK FOR WOMEN IN SCIENCE.
Washington, D.C.: U.S. G.P.O., 1948-1949. (Women's Bureau Bulletin, 223) In
eight parts: 1) science, 2) chemistry, 3) biological sciences, 4) mathematics
and statistics, 5) architecture and engineering, 6) physics and astronomy, 7)
geology, geography, and meteorology, 8) occupations related to science.
 
 197      Verbrugge, Martha H. "The Social Meaning of Personal Health: The
Ladies' Physiological Institute of Boston and Vicinity in the 1850's." In
HEALTH CARE IN AMERICA: ESSAYS IN SOCIAL HISTORY, ed. by Susan Reverby and
David Rosner, pp.45-66. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1979. Covers
19th-century popular self-education in physiology and hygiene.
 
 198      Vetter, Betty M. "The Last Two Decades (Statistics of Discrimination
Against Women Scientists and Engineers)." SCIENCE 86, 7 (July/August 1986):
62-63.
 
 199      Vetter, Betty M. "Changing Patterns of Recruitment and Employment."
In WOMEN IN SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING PROFESSIONS, ed. by Violet B. Haas and
Carolyn C. Perrucci, 59-74. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1981.
Traces women's scientific education and employment from the 1920s to the 1970s,
and forecasts demands for scientists in specified fields in the future.
Includes graphs.
 
 200      Vetter, Betty M. "Women Scientists and Engineers: Trends in
Participation." SCIENCE 214, no.4527 (18 December 1981): 1313-1321. Measures
women's progress in the 1970s. Includes tables.
 
 201      Visher, Stephen S. SCIENTISTS STARRED 1903-1943 IN "AMERICAN MEN OF
SCIENCE." Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1947. See list of fifty-
two "Women Starred," pp.148-149.
 
 202      Walton, Anne. "Attitudes to Women Scientists." CHEMISTRY IN BRITAIN
21, no.5 (May 1985): 461-465. Quotes extensively from men and women, 17th
century onwards.
 
 203      Warner, Deborah J. "Science Education for Women in Antebellum
America." ISIS 69, no.246 (March 1978): 58-67. Covers women's education for,
and contributions to, science (both formal and informal) before the Civil War.
 
 204      Warner, Deborah J. "Women in Science in Nineteenth-Century America."
JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN WOMEN'S MEDICAL ASSOCIATION 34, no.2 (February 1979):
59-66. Overview. Includes photographs.
 
 205      Weis, Lois. "Academic Women in Science, 1977-1984." ACADEME 73, no.1
(January/February 1987): 43-47. Data shows only slight progress in employment.
 
 206      White, Martha S. "Psychological and Social Barriers to Women in
Science." SCIENCE 170, no.3956 (23 October 1970): 413-416. How women's limited
opportunities to interact with colleagues negatively affected their careers in
science at that time.
 
 207      Wilson, Jane S., and Serber, Charlotte, eds. STANDING BY AND MAKING
DO: WOMEN OF WARTIME LOS ALAMOS. Los Alamos, NM: Los Alamos Historical Society,
1988.
 
 208      Wilson, Joan Hoff. "Dancing Dogs of the Colonial Period: Women
Scientists." EARLY AMERICAN LITERATURE 7, no.3 (Winter 1973): 225-235. Treats
Colonial women in botany, agronomy, horticulture, and medicine, and argues the
need for a new conceptual approach to studying them.
 
 209      "Women in Science: An Analysis of a Social Problem." HARVARD MAGAZINE
(October 1974): 14-19.
 
 210      Wupperman, Alice. "Women in `American Men of Science': a Tabular
Study From the Sixth Edition." JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL EDUCATION 18 (March 1941):
120-121. Statistics on the fields and occupations of 800 women (2.9% of the
total entries) in the 6th edition of AMS, 1938.
 
 211      Zuckerman, Harriet, and Cole, Jonathan R., and Bruer, John T., eds.
THE OUTER CIRCLE: WOMEN IN THE SCIENTIFIC COMMUNITY. New York: Norton, 1991.
Essays on gender issues in the careers of women scientists. Includes interviews
with geneticist Salome Waelsch, astrophysicist Andrea Dupree, and
biotechnologist Sandra Panen.
 
 212      Zuckerman, Harriet, and Cole, Jonathan. "Women in American Science."
MINERVA 13, no.1 (Spring 1975): 82-102. Outlines a "triple penalty" for women:
the cultural definition of science as an inappropriate career for women; belief
that women are less competent than men; and actual discrimination.


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Content of Bibliography last updated in 1993.
Format converted September 10, 1999.